My Old Face

My face needs a lot of fixing, apparently.  I had a coupon to go to one of those “medical spas” –shiny places people go for shiny faces.  People go there to remove spots, pores, hair, wrinkles, fat and freckles.  The kind of place that immediately springs to mind whenever I see a face belonging to a Kardashian or Kushner.  I was there because a friend had recommended I get a Kybella treatment.  Seems no matter what I weigh, I always carry some fat in my neck.  I have, as someone once put it, “more chins than a Chinese phonebook.”  With this coupon in hand, I thought here’s my chance to turn my double chin into a single one.

I handed the receptionist my coupon and she told me the doctor would be with me shortly.  I sat in this spotless, poreless room with a large screen showing a parade of before and after photos.  I honestly saw little and mostly no difference in the before and after photos, so they seemed like poor marketing tools, but maybe I just didn’t have the discerning jeweler’s eye needed to ascertain minute changes women’s faces and abdomens.  Also, I was terrified nervous about having a needle shoved into my neck, but I guess I was more daunted by the prospect of living with this neck o’ mine.

The doctor (she went to medical school) called me in.  I introduced myself and told her about some childhood experiences that gave me a sort of PTSD about people doing things to me when I’m lying down.  TMI perhaps, but I wanted to give her some context for was I was so anxious.  She waved it away and just said you’ll be sitting up.  This should have been a red flag because typically when I bring up aforementioned childhood experiences people usually a) get very uncomfortable, or b) at least feign sympathy.  This doctor just wanted to get on with the next body part in her conveyor belt of anatomy needing fixing.  My chin in her hand, she turned my head to the left, she turned it to the right.  Then she gave me the bad news.  My problem was too severe.  My neck couldn’t just be tweaked; Kybella couldn’t do the trick.  There’d be too much loose skin, and “that would look even worse.”

However, she saw lots of other things she could fix.  I needed injections in various places on my face to fix “marionette” lines near my mouth and lines near my nose.  I needed Botox on my forehead and I needed to plump up my top lip because it was too thin.  I said my top lip had always been thin.*  She replied, “Your lips get thinner as you age and your top lip is turning into itself,” she said.  I wasn’t sure what “turning into itself” meant, but its future looked bleak.  She told me they were having a special and I could get all these fixes for….I didn’t hear the price.  I didn’t want injections anywhere, especially not my lips. #LisaRinna

My head was spinning.  I’d come already rattled by the prospect a needle in my throat.  Now I slumped out of the austere white office, shuffling to the bank of elevators with the despondent diagnosis of a lifelong double chin and a face beset with neon signs of old age and asymmetrical lips.  I came in feeling a little ugly and I left feeling a lot ugly.  Numbed by her assessment, I walked sadly up Broadway.  But as the numbness wore off my sad turned into mad.

Here’s a doctor, a woman who went to medical school, and she’s telling me and other vulnerable women about all the things that need fixing.  Beset by messages all my life about all the things wrong with me (Hair! Face! Body! Scent! Attitude!) I’ve always had the mettle to meddle with all my flaws and fix them, where I could.  (God grant me the wisdom to know which things wrong with me I can fix and those things where I should just give up and maybe get a Master’s degree or a hobby.)  I’m used to being my own worst enemy; I’m used to some men being total judgmental dicks.  But Ms. Bedside Manners here spends her day preying upon her sisterhood’s fears and feelings.  I find that particularly infuriating.  The last thing I need is someone making me more insanely self-conscious about my upper lip, especially another woman.

It’s not like I don’t know what she’s talking about.  I know all the big and little things that keep me from being that generic pretty face.  Khloe Kardashian is absolutely unrecognizable from her former self.  Is she prettier?  Uh…I guess?  Yes, her face is closer to that singular pretty face mask with full (symmetrical) lips, a slim nose, big eyes and n’er a pore in sight.  There’s a generic, interchangeable ‘prettiness’, a facial destination to which Kylie Jenner fans, “Real Housewives” and too many teenage girls aspire.  I think it’s perfectly fine that women like me want to put our best selves forward.  But I think it’s important that it’s our unique selves we’re serving.  Khloe doesn’t look like Khloe anymore.  She looks like Face #4 in some Stepford lab.

If I fatten up my lips like the doctor suggested, who knows, maybe I would look prettier – to a stranger.  But I wouldn’t look like myself, I’d just have a face closer to that generic “ideal” that I had no hand in choosing.  I didn’t vote for the face I was born with, but I didn’t vote for that dumbass generic Instagram face either.  I’m keeping my face familiar. And now, if asked to pick between the two, I’ll choose myself.  Why?  Because ladies, no matter what someone tells you, always – always – choose yourself.

*I’ve always looked to photos of Gloria Grahame, Maggie Smith and Greta Garbo to try to cheer me up.

 

15 Comments

  1. Gloria Bailen

    OMG, girl, you can write! I’m not worthy! lol
    Truly, I loved this piece! You hit all the right notes and feels. It’s funny, poignant, and super authentic. Thanks for writing it.

    Reply
    • Dixie Laite

      Thank you, Gloria! I love this comment — it means a lot to me. xo

      Reply
  2. Jessica

    My daughter loves the Kardashians( where did I go wrong?!) I think their beauty is a shallow as their souls are. Me ? I’ll choose my stretch marks , worry lines , big belly & all my other trophies of a hard but well lived life. If someone can’t appreciate and love me for my crazy self, then they definitely aren’t my people to begin with. Stay beautiful just as you are😘!

    Reply
    • Dixie Laite

      Jessica, you’re a great role model for us all. I hope your daughters learn to love your substance and reject the Kardashians’ total lack of substance. What do they love about them???? Do they see what they’ve done to young women?

      Reply
  3. Susan Ring

    I love your face just the way it is.

    Reply
    • Dixie Laite

      Right back atcha, Susan. 🙂

      Reply
    • Minniehill@gmail.com

      You told truth!
      Loved every sad word, felt you by the elevator post visit.
      Loads of $$$$$&$$& made exploiting fear.

      Reply
  4. Eileen Michaels

    Dixie you are so spot on.
    Years ago it was suggested I get my nose done to match my face. It does match my face is the face that I was born within the nose that came with it. I was also suggested that I take the diction lessons.. Then who would know it’s me. Stay yourself Dixie we love you

    Reply
    • Dixie Laite

      I’d like to punch that someone in the face, Eileen. You are a goddess11

      Reply
    • Dixie Laite

      Thank you, Eileen. Your kindness is everything.

      Reply
  5. Joy

    Dixie, you have just made my day! I had a great laugh, and it made me relax. But you really need to know that, from the first time we saw each other, I fell totally in love with you, your beautiful and expressive face, and your uplifting spirit. You were another ‘daughter’ for me to love. 🥰 Also, beauty comes from your eyes-the window of your soul. And no one can improve on that. You definitely do NOT need a doctor for improvement!

    Reply
    • Dixie Laite

      Joy, you make me want to cry. I couldn’t ask for a better mother figure, and I am and would love to be a daughter to an angel like you. Xox

      Reply
  6. Janice Landrum

    On target! I had a legit area of redness on my forehead and asked the dermatologist at a check up to do what she could. She did, but suggested the age spots on my hands ALSO could be improved. Nope. Have to draw the line!

    Reply
    • Dixie Laite

      Yes, I know they’re just trying to make money, but it feels inappropriate to tell us about cosmetic “problems” we didnt bring up.

      Reply

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